Historic Bunkerville Well

Frequently Asked Questions

Billing Questions
How are late charges calculated?

Late charges are assessed if your water bill is not paid by the due date. Read our Billing Policies for more information about how these charges are calculated.

How do I read my bill?

A sample bill and an description of all elements on your bill are explained in detail on this page in the VVWD Customer Center: Your Bill Explained.

How often do you read my meter?

Meters are read monthly. Fire hydrant meters are tested annually.

Is it possible to get an adjustment on my bill after a leak is repaired?

The customer is responsible for leaks on the “Customer” side of the meter. Installment payments can be arranged for six months without late fees until the balance is paid.

What do I do if I feel I have been over-billed?

If you receive a water bill, which is unusually high, you may have a water leak. If you suspect a water leak there are some things you can do to find out. Read your water meter – use your water meter to check for leaks in your home. Start by turning off all faucets and water-using appliances. Make sure no one uses water during the test period. Take a reading on your meter; wait about 30 minutes then take a second reading. If the dial has moved, you have a leak.

Is the leak inside or outside your home? Turn off your house valve (emergency shut-off valve) and repeat the above process. If the dial has moved, the leak is between your meter and your home, otherwise, your leak is located inside your home, or in the pipes under your home.

  • Check for toilets that run . . . the most common source of leaks is in the toilet. Check all toilets for leaks by placing a few drops of food coloring in the tank. If after 15 minutes the dye shows up in the bowl, the toilet has a leak.
  • Check for leaky faucets . . . the next place to check for leaks is your sink and bathtub faucets. One drop of water per second wastes 2,100 gallons of water per year! Replacing the rubber O-ring or washer inside the valve can usually repair dripping faucets.

If you have taken the above steps to detect and correct the water leak and your consumption continues to increase, please contact the Virgin Valley Water District to speak to a customer service representative.

Where is my water meter located and how do I read it?

Most water meters are located at the front of your property at either the property line near the sidewalk or street. The District uses a “speedometer” type meter that works like the odometer in your car… except that it records gallons of water instead of miles traveled.

The series of numbers in the odometer reflect your water consumption in units of gallons. Read the numbers left to right, but don’t include the last three numbers on the far right. For example, if last month’s reading of 0045610 units is subtracted from this month’s reading of 0065610, then 20000 gallons for water usage that has been logged. This in turn equates to 20 units of billable usage. This is what would be reflected on your bill.

Who do I contact if I have questions about my bill?

Customers with concerns or questions about their bill should contact the Virgin Valley Water District Office, and discuss it with a Customer Service Representative.

Why is there a "service charge" on my bill?

The service charge covers the cost of reading and setting up new accounts, requests to re-read meter, requests to have meter locked and unlocked within a 3 month period and for requests to test meters.

General Service Questions
How is the board of directors elected?

Members of the Board are elected by a plurality of the qualified electors of the district and take office upon qualification therefore the first Monday in January next following the member’s election or appointment, whichever is later, and leave office upon the first Monday in January next following the election or appointment of the member’s successor in office.

Vacancies in the Board of Directors shall be filled by appointment of the remaining members of the Board and if the Board fails, neglects or refuses to fill the vacancy within thirty (30) days after a vacancy occurs, the Board of County Commissioners of Clark County shall fill the vacancy. Each member appointed to hold office as a director shall hold office for a term of not to exceed two (2) years.

Requirements for service

Members of the board must reside in the district for at least six (6) months before his or her appointment or the election at which the member is elected and be a qualified elector of the district.

How often do the board of directors meet?

Regular meetings

  • The District holds regular meetings on the first and third Tuesday of each month except on a legal holiday, when the regular meeting will be the day following the legal holiday. Meetings begin at 5:00 P.M., at the VVWD offices and continue until the business of the day shall be completed or until there shall be a recess to a further date. In the event there is not a sufficient amount of business to be conducted for two meetings a month, the General Manager reserves the right to cancel a meeting. Notices of cancellation shall be posted in accordance with the· requirements of Chapter 241 of the Nevada Revised Statutes known as the Nevada Open Meeting Law, as amended.
  • There is an annual meeting of the Board of Directors on the first Tuesday of October every year at which time a report of the business transacted during the preceding year by the District, including a financial report.

Special Meetings

  • Special meetings of the members of the Board of Directors may be called at any time by the president or at the written request of at least three (3) members of the said Board.
May I attend a Board Meeting to address an issue of concern to me?

Yes. The public is invited to all public meetings of the board. Citizens wishing to speak during public participation are asked to state their name for the record and limit comments to a minimal duration. However, no action will be taken on any item until it is properly agendized.

The VVWD offices are accessible to the handicapped. With 24-hour advance request, efforts to provide for special assistance or accommodation will be undertaken. Phone 702-346-5731 to make your request.

Why are you testing my water meter?

We periodically test water meters in the field to verify their accuracy and to develop replacement and maintenance criteria. With accurate meters, we know that consumers are charged for the water they actually use.

Water Questions
Are there pharmaceuticals in my drinking water?

All drinking water, including the less regulated bottled water, may be reasonably expected to contain at least small amounts of some contaminants. It is important to remember that the presence of contaminants does not necessarily indicate that the water poses a health risk.

Each water source is tested either on a quarterly or annual basis for 76 different contaminants as required by State and Federal agencies. Results of those tests can be found by contacting the Water District at 702-346-5731 or checking the the Water Quality portion of our website.

Do you recommend that I use a home water filter?

Our water meets all drinking water standards and doesn’t require additional treatment beyond what it already receives; however the choice to use a home filtration system is yours to make. Home filtration products can reduce chlorine levels and water cloudiness, which some would prefer not to taste, smell or see. In some cases, these filtration products can also remove metals such as lead and copper that could dissolve in the water during contact with household plumbing. If you do decide to install and use a water-filtration system, it is important to follow the manufacturer’s maintenance specifications.

How do I find out if I have a leak on my property?

There are a few easy steps to follow if you suspect a leak on your property. Start by turning off all faucets and water-using appliances. Make sure no one uses water during the test period. Next, go out to your meter and look for the red triangle on the face of the meter. If the red triangle is turning, you have a leak somewhere on your property.

Is the leak inside or outside your home? Turn off your house valve (emergency shut-off valve) and repeat the above process. If the dial has moved, the leak is between your meter and your home, otherwise, your leak is located inside your home, or in the pipes under your home.

  • Check for toilets that run . . . the most common source of leaks is in the toilet. Check all toilets for leaks by placing a few drops of food coloring in the tank. If after 15 minutes the dye shows up in the bowl, the toilet has a leak.
  • Check for leaky faucets . . . the next place to check for leaks is your sink and bathtub faucets. One drop of water per second wastes 2,100 gallons of water per year! Replacing the rubber O-ring or washer inside the valve can usually repair dripping faucets.
Is it a good idea to fix my leaky faucet?

Yes. Drips waste a precious resource – water, and it costs you money. As an example, if you have a faucet that drips 60 times a minute, this adds up to over 5 gallons each day or 2,100 gallons each year. To fix a leak, call your local plumber.

Is it okay to dispose of hazardous chemicals down the drain?

No. Hazardous materials such as oils and paint thinners disrupt the collection system and the treatment plant. The wastewater plant process cannot remove all hazardous chemicals, therefore, some may enter our water sources. The more polluted the water, the harder it is to clean, and the more expensive a process it becomes.

Is tap water suitable for use in a home kidney dialysis machine?

No, not without further treatment. In a kidney dialysis machine, the water used is brought into close contact with the patient’s blood. Thus, the quality requirements are far stricter than those for ordinary drinking water. Aluminum, fluoride, and chloramine are examples of substances that are not acceptable in water used for kidney dialysis. Kidney dialysis centers are kept informed about water quality and are able to give advice on this matter.

Is there lead in my water?

VVWD is required to test for lead every 3 years. There was no sign of lead at the 2015 testing. If present, the source is corrosion of household plumbing systems and erosion of natural deposits.

Is water treated with chlorine safe to drink?

Yes. Many tests have shown that the amount of chlorine found in treated water is safe to drink. Chlorine is needed to maintain disinfection throughout the distribution system. The potential for water contamination when chlorine is not used, outweighs any long-term concerns.

What can I do to conserve water?

The VVWD has collected some valuable resources for you to learn about water conservation.

What caused the blue-green stain where my water drips into my sink?

This stain comes from the chemical copper. Copper is present in your home plumbing and can dissolve into the drinking water.

What is going on with respect to arsenic levels in our water?

All five of the district’s federally-mandated arsenic treatment plants are on line.

Through the funding VVWD got from the Army Corps (of Engineers), the EPA (Environmental Protection Agency) and the state, the construction has been accomplished in a cost-effective way.

All the water we’re putting out is treated water and is below 10 parts per billion, the new, lower EPA requirement. We are proud of the efforts of our team to produce these results in such a short period of time.

What is the hardness of my water?

Hardness levels in Nevada waters are generally low but can range from near zero to several hundred milligrams per liter as calcium carbonate (mg/L as CaCO3), the standard unit for hardness. The Virgin Valley water source has a hardness value of 154 mg/l and is described as hard, as you can see from the following table.

Hardness Range (mg/L as CaCO3) Description
 0-75  Soft
 75-150  Moderately Hard
 150-300  Hard
 300+  Very Hard

The term hard water does not have a precise definition but is usually used to describe water which does not lather well when soap is added or which forms a scale inside hot water heaters. These problems are caused by high concentrations of the naturally occurring elements calcium and magnesium which depends largely on the local bedrock.

While there are no health-related regulations pertaining to drinking water hardness, a value below 100 mg/L is ideal for ordinary domestic purposes. Therefore, water softening for our residential customers is not necessary.

Why does my water sometimes look cloudy?

The cloudy water is caused by tiny air bubbles in the water similar to the gas bubbles in beer and carbonated soft drinks. It is particularly noticeable in water taken directly from the tap. Within seconds, the bubbles rise to the top and are gone. This type of cloudiness occurs more often in the winter, when water temperature is colder, and does not indicate any problem with the water.

Will putting a brick in my toilet tank save water?

Toilet flushing uses a lot of water, 40% of a household’s total water usage. Putting something in the toilet tank that takes up space, like a toilet dam or a water filled jug, is a good idea. However, putting a brick in the tank is not a good idea. Bricks tend to crumble and may damage your toilet.